Tall Tales From The Field

Remote Marble Canyon

Marble Canyon is that canyon that precedes the Grand Canyon. It’s a tough opening act but Marble Canyon is spectacular if not as grand.ย  Marble Canyon is actually part of Grand Canyon National Park. John Wesley Powell gave it it’s name even though there is no marble in the canyon. He thought its walls looked like marble.

I approached the rim of Marble Canyon last week from a road that few venture on. It’s a decent dirt road off Arizona Highway 89A. On my BLM map, it’s road 8910 and you take it about 25 miles to get to the canyon’s edge. When I camp at the upper elevations of the Kaibab National Forest in the summer, I look straight down towards Marble Canyon. From above it is a sharply defined rupture in the earth’s crust. The landscape is very flat leading up to the edge. But when you get to the rim, your breathe is taken away. You look straight down to its bottom and the Colorado River.

A backcountry road leads you through the Kaibab National Forest to Marble Canyon at Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

Road 8910 leads to remote view points of Marble Canyon.

 

Kaibab Camping Spot_0519I camp from the top of the Kaibab Plateau above and have a birdseye view of Marble Canyon. But you need to be at the rim to see the bottom.

 

Rays of sunlight light up the desert landscape around Marble Canyon near Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

 

The Colorado River has carved Marble Canyon just before The Grand Canyon in Northern Arizona

From Saddle Mountain.

 

Storm clouds develop along Marble Canyon at Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.

You have to reach the very edge of the rim for these views.

 

A thunderstorm passes along Marble Canyon at Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.

 

A thunderstorm passes along Marble Canyon at Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.

 

A thunderstorm passes along Marble Canyon at Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.

Looking towards The Grand Canyon.

 

A thunderstorm passes along Marble Canyon at Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.

 

A thunderstorm passes along Marble Canyon at Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.

 

A thunderstorm passes along Marble Canyon at Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.

 

A thunderstorm passes along Marble Canyon at Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.

 

A thunderstorm passes along Marble Canyon at Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.

From a side canyon of Marble Canyon.

 

12 responses

  1. woo this place is amazing, utterly breathless looking through your photos. Amazing beautiful capture and post. Have a wonderful Tuesday.

    Like

    April 25, 2016 at 4:48 PM

    • Thanks Cattan! Sometimes its difficult to photograph something extraordinary exactly how you saw and felt it.

      Liked by 1 person

      April 25, 2016 at 4:54 PM

  2. It might not be as grand as the Grand Canyon, but this place is pretty amazing. Your photos are spectacular.

    Liked by 1 person

    April 26, 2016 at 2:28 AM

  3. Superb photos of an amazing place. Thanks for sharing ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    April 26, 2016 at 3:37 AM

  4. Stunningly beautiful

    Liked by 1 person

    April 26, 2016 at 7:59 AM

  5. It is amazing to think, “Water did this.” Water and time. Wow.

    Liked by 1 person

    April 26, 2016 at 3:02 PM

  6. Amy

    Spectacular, Michael Unbelievable… Nat Geo shots!!!

    Like

    April 26, 2016 at 4:51 PM

    • Thanks Amy! Actually, it was a Nat Geo photo from about 10 years ago that led me to Marble Canyon

      Liked by 1 person

      April 26, 2016 at 5:21 PM

      • Amy

        ๐Ÿ™‚ Do you know NG has “Photo of the day” for photographer to submit and post?

        Like

        April 26, 2016 at 5:27 PM

      • Thanks Amy, I’ll check that out.

        Liked by 1 person

        May 3, 2016 at 8:34 AM

      • Amy

        ๐Ÿ™‚ ๐Ÿ™‚

        Like

        May 3, 2016 at 9:07 AM

  7. I love the sunlight coming through the clouds on the middle photograph. It always feels quite magical when I see this happen.

    Liked by 1 person

    May 3, 2016 at 7:12 AM

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