Tall Tales From The Field

Death Valley’s Badwater Basin

As Death Valley has come to life this winter with its large floral display, Badwater Basin is where the flowers don’t flourish.  Badwater Basin is probably where Death Valley got its name.  Nothing lives there. These salt flats cover some 200 square miles and provide little hope for life.  The salt is a result of the hot and arid climate in the park that evaporates any moisture, leaving only the salt behind.  At 282 feet below sea level, Badwater is the lowest point in North America, thus creating extremes in temperatures and dryness.

The salt flats of Badwater Basin at Death Valley National Park, California

 

The salt flats of Badwater Basin at Death Valley National Park, California

 

Wildflowers dominate the landscape at Badwater Basin at Death Valley National Park, California

Wildflowers grow up to the fringes of Badwater Basin, but no further.

 

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The salt flats of Badwater Basin at Death Valley National Park, California

 

The salt flats of Badwater Basin at Death Valley National Park, California

 

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18 responses

  1. very awesome! Great shots. How was the super bloom?

    Like

    March 2, 2016 at 11:40 AM

    • Thanks, here’s the link to my Super Bloom post http://wp.me/p1XNt4-1AJ

      Liked by 1 person

      March 2, 2016 at 12:08 PM

      • Beautiful! I saw that one already but enjoyed looking at the photos again just now. Love the coyote! And love the sunsets. I have a number of friends that are down that way… Enjoy!

        Like

        March 2, 2016 at 2:24 PM

      • The park was very crowded as all of the some 500 campground sites at Furnace Creek were occupied.

        Liked by 1 person

        March 2, 2016 at 2:50 PM

      • Wow, really!? One of the things I have always enjoyed about Death Valley is that there are relatively few visitors. Oh well, hope you enjoyed it anyway.

        Like

        March 2, 2016 at 5:08 PM

      • I ended up camping at a primitive and remote campground at Eureka Dunes. Photos to follow soon!

        Liked by 1 person

        March 2, 2016 at 5:57 PM

      • Awesome!

        Like

        March 2, 2016 at 11:10 PM

  2. Amy

    These are awesome captures of this stunning landscape!

    Like

    March 2, 2016 at 12:36 PM

  3. Great photos. Does the basin ever fill with water when it rains?

    Like

    March 2, 2016 at 1:11 PM

    • Thanks. I’ve never seen the basin become a large lake but I believe small pockets of water will form in places

      Liked by 1 person

      March 2, 2016 at 1:33 PM

      • I’m guessing the person who gave this place its name got a nasty surprise.

        Like

        March 2, 2016 at 1:36 PM

  4. What an beautiful, yet inhospitable landscape. My skin and eyes itch just thinking about it. ;-D

    Like

    March 2, 2016 at 4:27 PM

  5. Gorgeous place and looking at the photos it look so beautiful yet it is a harsh landscape.

    Like

    March 3, 2016 at 2:52 PM

    • It’s harsher in the summer when temps get to 120 degrees F

      Liked by 1 person

      March 3, 2016 at 5:33 PM

      • Amazing nature and sometime it make you wonder how the wildlife survive in this condition.

        Like

        March 4, 2016 at 6:19 AM

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