Tall Tales From The Field

Night Vision

The Southern Utah night sky is renowned for its brilliance. There are nights when you look up and see only stars, not much black. Around the new moon phase is the best time to watch and Orion is prevalent in the southern winter sky.

 

The Milky Way appears in the night sky in Southern Utah near Zion National Park

That bright star in the upper right is  Sirius, the brightest object in the night sky besides the moon and planets. Sirius is part of the constellation Canis Major which borders Orion. The Milky Way  forms to the south in this shot.  The object in lower left is a UFO.

 

The constellation Orion appears in the night sky at Zion National Park, Utah

The constellation Orion with the belt to center right. Betelgeuse, the amber star, is above the belt near the top of this image and Rigel is the blue star below the belt. Sirius is the bright object to the left. Rigel appears bright because it’s 47,000 times brighter than our own sun but some 800 light years from earth. Our sun is only 8 light minutes away from us.

 

The stars are out in large numbers at Zion National Park, Utah

This image was produced with a 30 second exposure, F4.0 and an ISO of 3200

 

The stars are out in large numbers at Zion National Park, Utah

This image was produced by taking 185 exposures for about 2 hours and stacking them in StarStaX.

 

The stars are out in large numbers at Zion National Park, Utah

The ambient light from the town of Springdale was just enough to light up The Watchman and a fence at Zion National Park, Utah

 

The Big Dipper can be seen in the dark skies at Zion National Park, Utah

The Big Dipper  is upside down during the winter. The top two stars point left towards Polaris(North Star) which is at the end of the Little Dipper.(Not Shown)

Advertisements

7 responses

  1. I don’t have a bucket list. I think they’re silly and have the potential to make you feel bad about not accomplishing them but, well…let’s just say your photography make me want to visit all the places I see in them.

    Like

    February 13, 2016 at 7:19 AM

    • Thanks Susanne! I don’t have a bucket list either because it would be endless.

      Like

      February 13, 2016 at 11:20 AM

  2. What an amazing view of the sky. It’s been so long since I’ve been able to see the stars like that.

    Liked by 1 person

    February 13, 2016 at 3:03 PM

  3. I’d love to one day see the stars without the light pollution that surrounds most of us. Living in a rural I do get to see more stars than city dwellers, but nothing like what I’ve heard described by folks like you. Thanks for sparking my imagination!

    Liked by 1 person

    February 13, 2016 at 6:59 PM

  4. WONDERFUL post and images!

    Liked by 1 person

    February 28, 2016 at 11:34 AM

  5. Thats long work–i can see that !

    Chees,
    Firasz

    Liked by 1 person

    March 1, 2016 at 10:40 AM

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s