Tall Tales From The Field

Instruction

Surreal Autumn Images

These are photographs taken this past week at Zion National Park, Utah. Utilizing in-camera techniques by moving the camera slightly during a slow exposure, you get a distorted image, but not quite a Monet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Distorted Forest Images

In-camera techniques produced images from the Kaibab National Forest and its Ponderosa Pines and Aspens.

Ponderos Pines thrive at The Kaibab National Forest near the north rim of The Grand Canyon, Arizona

Ponderosa Pines thrive at The Kaibab National Forest near the north rim of The Grand Canyon, Arizona

 

Ponderos Pines thrive at The Kaibab National Forest near the north rim of The Grand Canyon, Arizona

 

Ponderos Pines and Aspens thrive at The Kaibab National Forest near the north rim of The Grand Canyon, Arizona

 

Ponderos Pines thrive at The Kaibab National Forest near the north rim of The Grand Canyon, Arizona


Some More Camera Painting

Occasionally the scene presents itself for a little camera painting. I’m looking for vertical or horizontal shapes that I can move the camera parallel with during exposure. See previous post http://wp.me/p1XNt4-1w6   The Cypress Trees and Paintbrush blooms at Point Lobos made for worthy subjects.

 

Cypress Trees a bit blurred at Point Lobos State Natural Reserve at Carmel, California

 

Paintbrush is in bloom along the Pacific Ocean Coastline at Point Lobos State Natural Preserve at Carmel, California


Panoramas? Yes or No

Below are three similar images of the marine layer rolling into Carmel Valley on California’s Pacific Ocean Coastline. The top photo was produced by stitching 3 images in Photoshop. The second photo used two images and the last was one image.

With the clouds obscuring the sun along the coast, the light was extremely flat and not worth photographing. No glorious sunset shots today.  Then I remembered from a trip here years ago, that there was a good vantage point in the highlands of Carmel Valley, overlooking the Pacific Ocean.

These images and more are available for purchase as prints or downloadable files at Dawn2Dawn Photography

The sun sets beyond the approaching marine layer at Carmel Valley, California

 

The sun sets beyond the approaching marine layer at Carmel Valley, California

 

The sun sets beyond the approaching marine layer at Carmel Valley, California

And here’s a few more images from the area while the light was right!

 

The sun sets beyond the approaching marine layer at Carmel Valley, California

 

Oak Trees in a hilltop pasture overlook Carmel Valley, California

 

The sun sets beyond the approaching marine layer at Carmel Valley, California


Get Creative By Blending or Stacking Images

When I was on the California Coast recently, I decided to take numerous exposures of the exact same scene and then blend them in a software program. I also used these jpegs to produce a  time lapse video which can be viewed here http://wp.me/p1XNt4-1yi

But I wanted to see what you could produce if you blend 100 images of a moving scene, like moving waves and clouds. It’s similar to a longer exposure but I took an exposure every 20 seconds for about 35 minutes. Below you’ll also see the result and what the scene looked like with a single  normal exposure. I actually shot 2 different scenes and present them but I also show one image where I blend both scenes, which is the bottom image.

The sun sets over the Pacific Ocean at Cambria, California

First scene with 100 images blended

 

First scene with only one normal exposure. Not quite so dramatic.

 

The sun sets over the Pacific Ocean at Cambria, California

The second scene with about 50 images blended. Not quite as dramatic as the first because I used less exposures and the clouds were moving towards the camera.  In image one, the clouds were moving from left to right in the frame.

 

Cal Coast Sunset Original_0495

The second scene shot with one normal exposure

 

The sun sets over the Pacific Ocean at Cambria, California

Both scenes blended with about 150 exposures.

 

So, if you want to get creative, try taking multiple exposures and blending them in Lightroom, Photoshop or stack them with a stacking program like  StarStax

Remember to use a tripod, a shutter release or better, an intervalometer, which programs the length between exposures for your camera. You can just sit there and watch the waves crashing upon the beach.